Canon Powershot S120 review

Canon Powershot S120 is a small compact camera made with emphasis on image quality. It is the fifth model in Canon’s S-series and shares many similarities with previous models. It still has the same image sensor as S100 and S110 as is the case with the lens (now it lets in slightly more light), but you get higher resolution LCD, 60p full HD video and fast 12fps burst for JPEG format. Since the introductions of the S90 these cameras had a lot of satisfied customers and I was curios to see how the latest S120 fares with modern competitors, especially since there are a lot of options today that did not exist in 2009 when the  S90 hit the shelves.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM1 review

Lumix DMC-GM1 is the smallest mirrorless camera on the market, especially when used with collapsible 12-32mm kit lens or with Panasonic and Olympus pancake prime lenses. Despite that, it is a full featured interchangeable lens camera stuffed with loads of features and some of them are really unique like 1/16000 shutter speed, completely silent operation, time-lapse and stop-motion video and many more. It uses micro 4/3 lens mount what means it accept around 40 lenses from Panasonic and Olympus with full auto-focus support.

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Nikon D5300 review

Nikon D5300 is the latest “mid-range” amateur DSLR camera. It shares many features with the basic Nikon D3300, but on the paper it has more bells and whistles to make it more desirable than its more affordable brother. At the heart of the camera there is a 24 megapixel image sensor without anti-aliasing filter. It shoots at 5 frames per second, has Full HD video at 60 progressive frames per second, articulated LCD screen and WiFi/GPS receivers built-in.

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Canon Powershot SX510HS review

Canon Powershot SX510HS belongs to the midlle range ultra-zoom cameras category. It looks like a miniature DSLR to the untrained eye but still keeps compact overall dimensions and lower weight making it very portable. Its 30x optical zoom lens covers the range of 24-720mm in 35mm equivalent and is paired to a 12MP CMOS sensor what is a significant upgrade over previous SX500IS which had 16MP CCD sensor. Video recording is now possible in Full HD, burst got upgraded to 4 fps (only 0.8fps in SX500IS) and the camera now has a built-in WiFi connectivity.

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Olympus OM-D E-M10 review

Olympus OM-D E-M10 (another long name lol!) is the latest mirrorless offering from Olympus. It is very similar in design and specification compared to E-M5 but with some key specifications removed in order to make it cheaper. It has only 3-axis image stabilization instead of 5-axis and looses weather proofing, but it has higher resolution LCD, gains built in flash and WIFI and newer image processor which should result in even better images.

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Nikon D3300 review

Although mirrorless cameras got a firm grip on the market in the last several years, DSLR sale numbers are higher still. They are bigger, heavier and do not offer better image quality than comparable mirrorless with APS-C sensors. So what’s the catch? Why are they still more popular on global market? I tried to figure it out testing the latest entry-level Nikon DLSR: the D3300.

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Nikon Df review

When it was announced, I thought of the Nikon Df that it would be a dream come true. Classic styling, external controls for just about anything and superb full frame sensor from the flagship D4 camera should make any photographer drop their jaw and involuntarily grasp for their credit card. Even more, Nikon build the tensions with several “Pure photography” teaser videos so the expectations were quite high. Expectations are one thing; reality another. Df might just be the biggest disappointment of the last year. Find out why.

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Sony A5000 review

A5000 is the latest mirrorless camera from Sony. Don’t be confused by the new naming scheme, this is just  another ordinary NEX camera. Sony said they implemented the new naming scheme in order not to confuse customers, but the generally accepted opinion is that the confusion is now even worse. NEX name was well accepted and it was easy to distinguish cameras, but now you have one name – ALPHA for all Sony interchangeable lens cameras and some of them are E-mount, some are A-mount. For a novice or a non-gear head this is a nightmare. A5000 is actually the successor to NEX-3N which replaced the NEX-F3 which replaced the NEX-C3 which came after the original NEX-3 in 2010. Five models in three and a half years. What for? God only knows (and maybe someone from Sony).

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Sony DSC-RX100M2 review

Sony RX100 raised a lot of dust since it was announced year and a half ago. Besides all the bells and whistles that are expected of the advanced-level camera like a full range of manual settings, programmable controls and excellent build quality, RX100 got praises for its image quality and this is what matters most. Never before was there such a small camera with such image quality and the main reason behind it was a “huge” 13.2 x 8.8 mm CMOS sensor with 20 megapixels paired to excellent Zeiss branded zoom lens.

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Nikon 1 AW1 review

Both Nikon and Canon are very traditional companies. If it was up to them, mirrorless cameras would not even exist. But it is not up to them (luckily). Sony, Olympus, Panasonic and Fuji are putting all their effort in mirrorless concept and there’s a lot of customers who ditched DSLR and gone for smaller mirrorless form factor. In order to keep up to competition, Canon and Nikon released their own mirrorless cameras but there’s a catch. They didn’t want those models to compete with their own entry level DSLR models so they made them worse than they could be. Canon EOS M has dead slow  AF, Nikon used too small sensor size and both were too expensive from beginning. So (almost) nobody bought them. What a surprise.

In order to compete with far more advanced NEX, OM-D and Fuji cameras, you need to have something that makes you special. After two years, Nikon finally realized that so now we have AW1. Detail that makes it different is waterproofing so this little camera can go 15m (49ft) underwater, can withstand drops from 2m (6.6ft) and will happily work at -10°C (14°F). And all that without the need for special underwater case and you can still change lenses. Now we’re talking!

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